Ed O'Bannon - Famous Basketball Player

Ed O’Bannon Net Worth

$100,000

Ed O’Bannon, the famous American former professional basketball player, has a net worth of $100 thousand. Throughout his career, O’Bannon achieved numerous accolades, including winning the NCAA Championship in 1995 and being named the NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player.

Key facts:

  • O'Bannon had a remarkable college career playing at UCLA where he won an NCAA Championship in 1995 and was named the NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player.
  • He was also named the USBWA College Player of the Year, Pac-10 co-Player of the Year, won the John R. Wooden Award, and was named a consensus first-team All-American in 1996.
  • O'Bannon was named third-team All-American in 1994 and was a three-time First-team All-Pac-10 selection.
  • His #31 jersey was retired by UCLA, and he was elected to the UCLA Athletics Hall of Fame in 2005 and the Pac-12 Conference Hall of Honor in 2012.
  • O'Bannon is the lead plaintiff in the O'Bannon vs. NCAA, which is an antitrust class-action lawsuit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association regarding the use of images of college athletes by the NCAA and whether the players should be compensated for their usage.

Basic Information About Ed O’Bannon

CategoryAthletes β€Ί NBA Players
ProfessionsBasketball player
Net worth$100,000
Date of birth1972-08-14 (51 years old)
Place of birthLos Angeles
NationalityUnited States of America
GenderMale
Social Mediaβ†—οΈŽ Wikipedia

Net Worth Details

Ed O’Bannon, the former professional basketball player, has a net worth of $100 thousand. Throughout his career, he was able to showcase his talent and achieve remarkable accomplishments in the world of basketball.

Biography

What is Ed O’Bannon known for?

Ed O’Bannon is widely known for his exceptional skills as a power forward and his pivotal role in leading the UCLA Bruins to an NCAA Championship victory in 1995. He was also recognized as the NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player in the same year.

Early life and education

Born in August 1972 in Los Angeles, California, Ed O’Bannon began his basketball journey at Artesia High School, where he made a significant impact on the court. At Artesia, he helped his team win a California Interscholastic Federation Division II state championship and was named the MVP at the prestigious Dapper Dan Classic.

Career

After high school, O’Bannon joined the renowned University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he continued to exhibit his remarkable basketball skills. During his time at UCLA, O’Bannon achieved tremendous success and became one of the most prominent figures in college basketball.

In 1995, O’Bannon played an instrumental role in leading UCLA to an NCAA Championship victory, where he showcased his exceptional abilities and earned the title of NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player.

During his college career, O’Bannon received numerous accolades and awards, including the USBWA College Player of the Year, Pac-10 co-Player of the Year, and the prestigious John R. Wooden Award. His brilliant performances on the court also earned him a spot as a consensus first-team All-American in 1996. Additionally, he was named a third-team All-American in 1994 and was a three-time First-team All-Pac-10 selection.

Due to his outstanding contributions to UCLA basketball, O’Bannon’s jersey number, #31, was rightfully retired by the university. In recognition of his achievements, he was elected to the UCLA Athletics Hall of Fame in 2005 and the Pac-12 Conference Hall of Honor in 2012.

Following his successful college career, O’Bannon entered the NBA, where he was selected as the number nine pick by the New Jersey Nets in the 1995 NBA Draft. He played for the Nets from 1995 to 1997 and later joined the Dallas Mavericks in 1997.

After his NBA stint, O’Bannon’s love for basketball led him to explore opportunities beyond the United States. He played in various international leagues, including the CBA, Italy, Spain, Greece, Argentina, the ABA, and Poland. O’Bannon’s passion for the game took him to different corners of the world, where he shared his skills and contributed to the growth of basketball globally.

Aside from his achievements on the court, O’Bannon made a significant impact off the court as well. He became the lead plaintiff in the O’Bannon vs. NCAA antitrust class action lawsuit, which focused on whether college athletes should be compensated for the use of their images by the NCAA. This case raised important discussions regarding the rights and fair treatment of college athletes.

Achievements

College and National Achievements

Ed O’Bannon’s list of achievements is awe-inspiring. Alongside winning the NCAA Championship in 1995 and being named the NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player, he received the USBWA College Player of the Year award and was a consensus first-team All-American in 1996. His dedication and talent earned him a permanent place in UCLA’s Athletics Hall of Fame and the Pac-12 Conference Hall of Honor.

International Achievements

O’Bannon also represented the United States on the international stage, winning gold medals at both the 199 FIBA Americas U18 Championship and the 1993 Summer Universiade. His contributions to USA Basketball showcased his versatility and skill, solidifying his reputation as an exceptional athlete.

Legacy

Ed O’Bannon’s impact and contribution to college basketball, alongside his involvement in advocating for the rights of college athletes, have left a lasting legacy. He played a significant role in sparking discussions surrounding compensation and fair treatment of athletes whose images and performances generate substantial revenue for educational institutions.

O’Bannon’s commitment to the game of basketball and his activism have made him an influential figure both on and off the court. His journey is a testament to the power of perseverance, talent, and dedication in achieving greatness.

Ed O’Bannon Famous Network

Male NBA ♂️ With Net Worth Closest To $100,000

Female NBA ♀️ With Net Worth Closest To $100,000

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Table of contents